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How much should I charge for making a web site?

Thread title: How much should I charge for making a web site?
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09-26-2007, 06:28 AM
#1
preet is offline preet
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  Old  How much should I charge for making a web site?

Hi,

there's a company I know that needs a web site for internal use.

I already made the requirements (with the help of someone I know from inside the company) and determined that the web site would have 7 modules, each containing 3 php files on average.

Now, I'll have to do their mysql database (installation, design and optimization) as well php code for the server side and javascript on the client side for dynamic pages.

I plan to do the look myself (html, css, photoshop edited pictures).

I also plan to provide them a specification and design document as well (for mutual understanding and to facilitate maintenance later on).

Now, I'm about to bring them a proposal (the requirement document and a pricetag for the project), but I when I do, I know that they'll probably compare whatever offer I make them against that of a couple of web site design company
So my question is: in your estimation, how much would a web development company charge for this?

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09-26-2007, 10:51 AM
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Choco is offline Choco
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  Old

If you're an experienced company with lots of well-done jobs behind you, I'd suggest you work by the hour. Choose an hourly price (something like $60/an hour) and estimate how long this will take you to do. Then multiply the two, add a bonus for completion, and you've got your quote.

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10-30-2007, 07:45 PM
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alefort is offline alefort
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Don't forget to add in the perceived value of the site for the client.

If someone plans on making millions off a site I design and code, I would expect to charge them more.

If it is a personal site for their rambling blog, then I would charge much less.

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10-30-2007, 07:58 PM
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Village Genius is offline Village Genius
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1. Value yourself
How much would you charge? Are you experienced in what you do? Only you can answer that.

2. How long will the project take
Map out what you think the project will take

3. Give your price
Your Fee * Hours it will take

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11-08-2007, 05:06 PM
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  Old

I just let clients make me an offer, and I'll usually say yes as long as they are not ridiculous. Not pro, but it keeps em' happy

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04-25-2008, 08:31 PM
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  Old

It takes a bit of restraint, but I think it's better, if a client comes along and says "Can you do this job for XX amount?" - and XX is something you'd consider pretty low, then you tell then you have a minimum you'd consider working for.

I've done it plenty times in the past, where I've taken on a job for a low amount, and come to regret it - the client expects a lot, I can't give them a lot because of time pressures and other work, and in the end neither party is terribly happy

Find a figure you're happy with (an hourly rate will usually do - $60/hour sounds very reasonable) and stick with it - the Village Idiot is right


One of my particular gripes is that some website companies seem to offer all sorts of random prices - if a client goes off to "Price compare" your services, they'll probably find the same services advertised for anything from $5 to $5000 - What (in my opinion) a client values most, is a designer who knows what he can provide, knows how long it'll take and can say "Here's what I'm worth, here's what I can do for you" - most people are willing to pay for quality if they know they'll get it.

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05-22-2008, 06:35 PM
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Anthillz is offline Anthillz
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  Old

It's true that you might want to think of a per hour rate. This is crucial when there becomes long-lists of micro-variations and little things that the client asks for that combine to take up a lot more time then you had initial budgeted.

One way to do this is come up with a project price, divide by hours you estimate it will take, and then add alittle bit of cushion space for additional work and for bonus. Not sure exactly but maybe 10%?

Good luck, but expect if you are a freelancer getting compared to some firms that you are most likely going to be the one on the cheapside.

Don't be afraid to ask to get paid what the final product is worth and not just how much you think what you put-in to it is worth.

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05-26-2008, 01:28 AM
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iwearoddsocks is offline iwearoddsocks
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I reccomend $20/Hour its effective, work out how many hours you will be working for and times it by 20, you got your price.

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07-12-2008, 04:00 AM
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You might want to consider negotiating a cut of the profits. Say, 2 percent of their profits the first year, and 1 percent of their profits the second year.

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07-14-2008, 02:20 PM
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It will be easier to charge them by module, and complexity of each module.

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